Monday, February 9, 2015

Job Seekers Beware: 'Re-packing' Jobs Could Lead To Jail Time!



We keep hearing the economy is improving, but that news rings hollow for many Americans. Long-term unemployment is still a reality for 2.8 million people. They're isolated and increasingly desperate, making them a perfect target for cyber-criminals.

The Better Business Bureau is reporting a new breed of cyber-crime that turns innocent people into accessories in the distribution of stolen merchandise. The scam starts like a lot of others, with a job offer from an anonymous company. The work sounds ideal. It's work-from-home, set your own hours, and work as much or as little as you like. Best of all, it's easy. You receive shipments at your house, then repack them and ship them to another address.

If you sign up, you'll receive packages containing products and instructions about shipping them to other addresses, sometimes overseas. Your employer will want you to cover shipping, but promises to reimburse you for costs on top of your salary. At the end of the month, you get a check from your employer.

The first bad news comes when you attempt to cash that paycheck and it turns out to be fake. All the work you've done, plus the shipping costs you paid out of pocket, are gone. It'd be bad enough if it ended there.

Worse yet, you might end up facing criminal charges. At the very least, you'll be an accessory to the theft of the goods you handled. If you helped to redistribute those goods, you handled stolen property. Even if you didn't know the goods are stolen, if you didn't ask questions where a reasonable person would have, you're guilty.

To make matters worse, if you shipped those items internationally, you likely had to lie on customs documents. That's a federal offense. The scammers just tricked you into taking all of the legal risk while they keep the money.

Similar scams are common in money laundering. A scammer will contact you or leave a post on a job board asking for financial service assistance. They'll send a check and ask you to deposit it, then wire them back some of the money. You can keep a portion of it as your payment. The check was written against stolen funds and the issuing institution refuses to pay it. You're out whatever you wired the scammer and could face charges as an accessory to fraud.

These scams are an unfortunate part of the job search process. They prey on the uncertainty and desperation that characterizes long-term unemployment. The widely anonymous nature of the Internet provides a perfect cover for schemers. If you want to keep yourself safe, follow these tips: 

1.) Be proactive in your job search 

It's possible that your dream job may fall in your lap, though it's far more likely that you'll have to work really hard to get it. If you post your resume on a job site and walk away, it's possible that the only people who are going to contact you are scammers. If you work with a recruiter or employment agency, you'll form a contact that can help you land the job you want.

Working with an agency will also help you weed out the scams. You'll have someone you know and trust to sort the real opportunities from the bogus ones. They'll help put your resume in places where it needs to be instead of in the wrong hands. 

2.) Check the links 

Many of these scams work by "spoofing" a legitimate job posting. You'll see an email saying that X company has reviewed your resume and thinks you would be a good fit for this position. The email will contain a link to something designed to look like a legitimate job posting on a big job board like Monster or Indeed.

Checking to see where links are really going is a hassle, but a quick mouse-over the link will show you the URL. If you don't recognize the domain (the first part after the http:// and before the .com or .org), don't click the link. Report the email as the scam attempt it is. 

3.) Watch for keywords 

"Repackaging" or "reboxing" are common keywords in these scams. For money-laundering, scammers often refer to the work they are proposing as "payment processing" or "wire transfer assistance." It's worth taking a moment to think about what you'd be doing. No legitimate business would need a personal checking account to move money around. If they're a business that can pay for your services, they have a checking account. Similarly, they have an address and postal services.

If an employer is seeking your personal information before they've hired you, they're not a potential employer. They're crooks trying to steal your identity. It's as simple as that. 

SOURCES: 
http://www.tylerpaper.com/TP-News+Local/212834/look-out-for-reshipping-job-scams#.VNJ-I9X3-ix  
http://career-advice.monster.com/job-search/getting-started/money-laundering-reshipping-scams/article.aspx
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm

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